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theclearlydope:

WORTH SEEING: “F*CK IT, I QUIT.” This is the proper way to quit a job. 

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BBC tells Australian govt to treat VPN users as pirates

mostlysignssomeportents:

BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the UK public broadcaster, has told an Australian government proceeding that people who use VPNs a lot should be assumed to be engaged in piracy, that ISPs should surveil their users, that websites should be censored by Chinese-style national firewalls, and that the families of people accused of watching TV the wrong way should be disconnected from the Internet.

Read more…

(via emergentfutures)

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letsbe-adventurous:

I literally love this, 

(Source: devoureth, via vorpalsuicide)

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nosleeptilbushwick:

this is absolutely incredible

(Source: sizvideos, via sg-babes)

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emergentfutures:

MIT study: Services like UberPool, Lyft Line cut transit time, pollution


MIT News has the details of a study that analyzed 150 million trip records from more than 13,000 taxi cabs in New York City. Researchers from MIT, Cornell, and the Italian National Research Council’s Institute for Informatics and Telematics applied a series of algorithms and found that if people were willing to wait an extra five minutes per trip to pick up other passengers, almost 95 percent of trips could be shared. If that happened, travel time could have been slashed by more than 30 percent while also reducing traffic and pollution.


Full Story: GeekWire

emergentfutures:

MIT study: Services like UberPool, Lyft Line cut transit time, pollution

MIT News has the details of a study that analyzed 150 million trip records from more than 13,000 taxi cabs in New York City. Researchers from MIT, Cornell, and the Italian National Research Council’s Institute for Informatics and Telematics applied a series of algorithms and found that if people were willing to wait an extra five minutes per trip to pick up other passengers, almost 95 percent of trips could be shared. If that happened, travel time could have been slashed by more than 30 percent while also reducing traffic and pollution.

Full Story: GeekWire

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stoweboyd:

datarep:

Money raised from popular fundraisers and the number of related disease deaths.
Read More

Proof of human stupidity #457

stoweboyd:

datarep:

Money raised from popular fundraisers and the number of related disease deaths.

Read More

Proof of human stupidity #457

(via emergentfutures)

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futurescope:

Fraunhofer IIS presents world’s first emotion detection app on Google Glass

The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has adapted its SHORE™ real-time face detection and analysis software to work with Google Glass:

Fraunhofer IIS presents a real-time* face tracker on Google Glass that can read people’s emotions. At the same time it also estimates age and gender of persons in front of Glass’ camera. Privacy is important: everything happens inside Glass – no image leaves the device. Detection is anonymous – no facial recognition. The app is based on SHORE, Fraunhofer’s proprietary software library for real-time facial detection and analysis. Emotion analysis on wearable devices has endless applications. E.g. it can be used in aids for people suffering from ASD (autism spectrum disorders) or for visually impaired.

(* low frame rate shown in the video is due to a bottleneck in the technique used to mirror Glass’ display on a computer monitor.)

[read more]

(via emergentfutures)

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(Source: knigh-t, via gogoblackwater)

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emergentfutures:

A Fully Mechanical 3D Printer is Mind Blowing


That’s right. Mechanical.
No computers, no motors, just the power of gravity. It could have been built 100 years ago.
The machine uses a 15kg weight to power the mechanism — it does need to be reset during the print, but that’s a small price to pay for this kind of mechanical automation.

Full Story: Hackaday

emergentfutures:

A Fully Mechanical 3D Printer is Mind Blowing

That’s right. Mechanical.

No computers, no motors, just the power of gravity. It could have been built 100 years ago.

The machine uses a 15kg weight to power the mechanism — it does need to be reset during the print, but that’s a small price to pay for this kind of mechanical automation.

Full Story: Hackaday